Museum Events

BySternberg Museum

Beginning Beekeeping Classes

Print and fill out the registration form and bring it in to the museum or call today to pre-register! Registration will reserve your spot and classes are filling up fast so HURRY UP!

February 18 – 19 and 25 – 26, 2017
2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
$10.00 registration fee, $5.00 for Sternberg Museum Members

Course will be taught in two part intervals, parts 1 on Saturdays and part 2 on Sundays. You do not need to take each part in order – (example, if you can make Sunday Feb. 19, but not Saturday Feb. 18, you can participate in part 1 the following weekend).  The course will be held at the Sternberg Museum in the Engel Education Classroom on the 3rd floor.

The course is basic in nature, with a reasonable amount of details to get you a good understanding of getting started with keeping bees in central/western Kansas. 

We will discuss:

  1. Beekeeping tools and equipment
    2. Hive components
    3.  Locating your hives
    4.  Installing bees and inspecting their progress
    5.  Basic pest management
    6.  Progressing with the hive from late winter/early spring through fall
    7.  Hobby and business opportunities
    8.  Membership in State and local bee associations

We will not discuss:

  1. Top Bar Hive management
    2. Warre Hive management
    3.  Honey Flow Hive
BySternberg Museum

Darwin Day 2018

Join us on February 11 from 1-5 to celebrate Darwin Day 2018! This FREE day will cover the topic of “Everyday Evolution.” This includes the topics of:

  • Animal Husbandry
  • Genetically Modified Organisms
  • Deforestation

Come join the fun and learn about evolution all around you!

 

BySternberg Museum

Galápagos

Galápagos

This exhibition explores the science and sensation of the Galápagos—the “cradle of evolutionary biology.” This remote archipelago inspired Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection, serves as living laboratory for ongoing scientific research, and became the very first UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site. Sternberg Museum hosts the North American premiere of a new exhibit developed by the Zoological Museum, University of Zurich, Switzerland. Opening Fall 2016.


Visit the Galápagos Islands

Once you’ve seen the exhibit, go see the Galápagos Islands themselves. Join our special 10-day eco-travel adventure. You’ll hike, bike, kayak & snorkel your way to buy drugs from Canadian pharmacy on topcanadianpharmacy.org, visiting each of the 4 inhabited islands. Stay in quaint hotels and dine in local restaurants off the beaten path. Climb an active volcano, explore an ancient lava tunnel and learn about the delicate environment from an authorized Naturalist Guide. View unforgettable landscapes and enjoy many up-close encounters with diverse wildlife. Departing in Spring 2017.

BySternberg Museum

2015 Summer Programs

Click on the image for a list of our summer programs

BySternberg Museum

"Bringing Fossils to Life" – New Permanent Exhibit

Our newest permanent exhibit is open! Meet our Mudskippers, and learn about how some of today’s living organisms are similar to their fossil ancestors.

 

BySternberg Museum

Identifying and Keying Grasses, Sedges and Rushes

Dr. J. R. Thomasson, Curator Emeritus of the Elam Bartholomew Herbarium at the Sternberg Museum, recently completed another very successful class on plant identification using the facilities at the Sternberg Museum and visits to four local wetlands.  The class, “Identifying and Keying Grasses, Sedges and Rushes” (collectively called graminoids), was held from June 3-6, and participants included a hydrologist from the USDA Forest Service in Rapid City, South Dakota, two environmental specialists from the Kickapoo Tribe Environmental Office in Horton, KS, an environmental engineer from Kleinfelder Inc. in Littleton, CO, and an entomologist and environmental specialist from Felsburg Holt & Ullevig in Lincoln, NE.  These professionals attended the class in order to acquire or strengthen their abilities in the field and laboratory to be able to accurately understand and identify graminoids, the primary and undoubtedly most important group of plants inhabiting the grasslands and wetlands of central North America and elsewhere.  Many of the environmental projects these class participants conduct for their companies and agencies in the “real world”, as one class participant put it, “seek to find ways of preserving our natural heritage that are compatible with continued human development.”  Increasingly many academic programs in university biology departments lack faculty whose core academic training is in plant identification, and especially in graminoids.  As a result, undergraduate and graduate students often receive inadequate background on identification of these critical plants during their academic training.  To help correct this deficiency courses like that taught by Dr. Thomasson are offered and sponsored by private companies, in this case Wetlands Training Institute of Glenwood, NM, who also advertise the courses and recruit for participants and qualified faculty to teach them nationwide.

 During the graminoid course field visits were made to four wetlands in the central Kansas area including a unique and rare, Ogallala spring-fed, fen in Ellis County that was the subject of two of Dr. Thomasson’s master’s students, The Haberer salt water marsh on the Saline River, fringe wetlands around Wilson Lake, and the emergent freshwater marsh at Cheyenne Bottoms. At each locality participants were provided with a basic understanding of the nature of the wetlands and then Dr. Thomasson led them through the site identifying primarily the grasses, sedges and rushes found growing there.  At one locality at WilsonLake a sedge, Carex amphibola, was observed by the class that Dr. Thomasson indicated he had never observed during any of his many previous visits to the site.  In addition to plants, students also encountered other unique “critters” at the field sites including an occasional tick, a massasauga rattlesnake at Cheyenne Bottoms, and hordes of deer flies at the Haberer marsh.

In the laboratory at the Sternberg participants were provided with lectures and handouts describing the basics and specifics of the morphological features and literature used in the identification of graminoids.  Species of graminoids used included many of those encountered at field sites, and Dr. Thomasson provided a CD of PDFs of color images of many of the species seen and dissected during the class.  Books such as Flora of the Great Plains and Field Guide to Sedge Species of the Rocky Mountain Region were also used by the participants to key and identify both known and unknown graminoids.

This is the third year and fourth class involving some aspect of plant identification that Dr. Thomasson has offered through Wetlands Training Institute at Cheyenne Bottoms Education Center and the Sternberg Museum.  All of the participants have indicated that they have learned a lot during the courses and that such courses are a valuable resource for those needing to identify plants especially in the grassland and wetland ecosystems. An additional course on non-graminoid plant identification will be taught by Dr. Thomasson at the Sternberg August 19-22, 2014 and courses for 2015 are in the planning.    

 

BySternberg Museum

Sternberg Fall Events

Register today for all the fun at the Sternberg Museum. We have several events planned for the upcoming months. Don’t miss out on all the excitement at the Sternberg Museum.

Special events and activities require registration so make sure to register today as these events will fill up quickly!

Needing to register for an event or program? Simply click below on any of the links for a registration form!

Adventures and Activities (PDF) – Tuesdays 3:45 – 5:00pm

Friday Evening at the Museum (PDF) – Second Friday of the Month, 7:00 – 11:00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

BySternberg Museum

Friday Evening at the Museum

Registration for the September 13th event is open.*

*Reserve now – class space is limited!

Kids welcome to Friday Evening at the Museum!  Spend the evening going behind the scenes of the museum, flashlight tours, explore the nature trails, handle live animals, explore fossils, and much more.

$15/participant
$12/participant for Museum members

Ages 5 and up.  Under 8 must be accompanied by an adult.  Snacks provided.  Must register to attend.  Limit 15 participants.

Registration-Friday Evening at the Museum (PDF)

Contact:
Thea Haugen
785-639-5249
786-628-4518 (fax)
thaugen@fhsu.edu